I wrote the book on user-friendly design. What I see today horrifies me.

When products are developed for the elderly, they tend to be ugly and an unwanted signal of fragility. As a result, people who need walkers or canes often resist. Once upon a time, a cane was stylish: Today it is seen as a medical device. Why can’t we have walkers and canes for everyday use, to help us in everyday life, to carry our packages, provide a way to sit when we are tired, or viewing some event, and yes, to maintain our balance? Make them items of pride, stylish enough that everyone will want one.

We've created a false narrative that designing things that are accessible means designing things that "look" accessible, and therefore awful. I am very happy to see industry people pointing this out for the falsehood that it is.

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We've created a false narrative that designing things that are accessible means designing things that "look" accessible, and therefore awful. The author of The Design of Everyday Things disagrees.

https://www.sonniesedge.net/bookmarks/2637

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How the hell are you getting all these replies on here, Charlie?

Ah, sweet summer child. It's time to send your own Webmention!